Department Executive Officer Participants

Richard J. Bischoff, Ph.D.

Richard J. Bischoff, Ph.D.

Richard Bischoff is the Gwendolyn A Newkirk Professor of Leadership in Child, Youth and Family Studies and Chair of the department of Child, Youth and Family Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He has been Chair of the department since 2011. His research and scholarship has been in the area of mental health care disparities. He has developed a model of mental health care delivery to reach underserved populations that incorporates collaborative healthcare, rural mental health, and telemental health. He received his doctoral degree in Marriage and Family Therapy from Purdue University. His master’s degree is from Auburn University and his bachelor’s degree is from Weber State College.

Chris Dunsmore

Chris Dunsmore

Chris Dunsmore is the Director of Programs in English as a Second Language at the University of Nebraska Lincoln (UNL). He earned a B.A. in English and M.A. in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) from Michigan State University and taught for several years in the Republic of Korea for various institutions including Samsung, Hyundai, LG, and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Graduate School of Management (KAIST- KGSM). He also served as Director of the English Language Institute at Central Michigan University for nine years prior to joining UNL in July of 2013.

Matthew B. Dwyer, Ph.D.

Matthew B. Dwyer, Ph.D.

Matthew B. Dwyer is the Lovell Professor of Engineering and Chair of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln. He earned a Doctorate in Computer Science from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1995. From 1985 through 1990 he was a senior engineer at Intermetrics Inc. working on the development of embedded systems and compilers.

He has more than 120 refereed publications in the areas of software testing, analysis and verification. His research has received multiple "Distinguished Paper" awards including the ICSE "Most Influential Paper" and SIGSOFT "Impact Paper" awards in 2010. He has been named an ACM Distinguished Scientist (2007), a Fulbright Research Scholar (2011), and an IEEE Fellow (2013). Dr. Dwyer has served in a number of service leadership roles for the international Software Engineering research community including as Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering - a position he has held since 2014.

Dr. Tracy D. Frank

Dr. Tracy D. Frank

Dr. Tracy D. Frank is Professor and Chair of the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, where she has been a faculty member since 2004. She currently holds a Susan J. Rosowski Professorship. Frank completed her Ph.D. in Geology at the University of Michigan and her undergraduate studies at Iowa State University. She is a sedimentary geochemist who uses chemical and textural signatures in ancient sedimentary rocks to reconstruct past variations in Earth’s climate, environment, and oceanography over a broad range of temporal and spatial scales. Fieldwork has taken her to such diverse locations as the Great Barrier Reef, the Canadian Arctic, Antarctica, and the western US. She has also participated on oceanographic research expeditions to the Bahamas, northern Pacific, and northeast Atlantic with the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and international initiative to study Earth’s history as recorded in seafloor deposits. Frank’s research has been published in more than 50 peer-reviewed articles in books and journals. She currently serves as editor-in-chief of the journal Sedimentology.

Kevin B. Smith

Kevin B. Smith

Kevin Smith spent more than a decade studying public policy, public administration and bureaucratic behavior. About ten years ago he became interested in the biological basis of attitudes and behavior, especially in how the theories and methods of cognitive psychology, behavioral genetics, and psychophysiology might be employed to better understand political traits. For most of that time he has closely collaborated with John Hibbing (University of Nebraska-Lincoln) and John Alford (Rice University) on a range of research projects that investigate biological correlates of political, social and economic behavior and attitudes. The latter include serving as Co-PI on project to create the first-ever data set specifically designed to investigate the heritability of political, social and economic traits (available on this website), co-founding the UNL Political Physiology Lab, and being a Co-PI on the Human Social Dynamics (HSD) project, an NSF-funded project that is the first attempt to investigate a comprehensive set of biological markers of political behavior (genes, physiology, endocrinology, brain imaging) on a representative sample of adult citizens. He has authored or co-authored nine books as well as dozens of journal articles and book chapters. He has served as co-editor of State Politics & Policy Quarterly, was a long-time director of the UNL Political Science Graduate Program, chairs UNL's Systems Biology of Social Behavior initiative, and is a recent recipient of the College of Arts and Science's Outstanding Research and Creative Achievement award.